[NEW] The Patrick Melrose Novels | patrick melrose – Pickpeup

patrick melrose: คุณกำลังดูกระทู้

Investors talk often about risk-return tradeoffs. The more volatile an asset is, the higher the expected return has to be to want to hold it. The four short books packaged together as are at the extreme end of the risk-return spectrum. Edward St. Aubyn took big chances hoping the rewards would be commensurate. He risked alienating readers at every turn with characters who are loathsome or over-exposed. And with the depth of the interior development, the potential losse

are at the extreme end of the risk-return spectrum. Edward St. Aubyn took big chances hoping the rewards would be commensurate. He risked alienating readers at every turn with characters who are loathsome or over-exposed. And with the depth of the interior development, the potential losses (and gains) in credibility were magnified. Fortunately, from this investor’s point of view, the gamble paid off. It helps to have a taste for an acerbic wit. Realize, too, we’re not talking about vinegar here; more like sulfuric acid.

In novel number one, Patrick is only five years old, living with his family in the south of France where the money from his mother’s side of the family allows them to live on the hog. Forgive me for flogging the metaphor, but such dining offers no guarantee against indigestion. Patrick’s father, David, is the primary cause, though his lush of a mother can be faulted, too, for her lack of intervention. David came from an aristocratic English family. He had at one time been a talented pianist and had also been trained as a physician (though one who must have had his fingers crossed when he took the Hippocratic Oath). By the time of this story, he was vile and abusive. Hard-not-to-cringe abusive, in fact. Patrick was a bright boy and, by nature, quite brave, but he lacked the power to stand up to his father.

Much of the first story took place at a dinner party attended by David’s imperious friends. Zingers like this were bandied about:

‘Nothing but the best, or go without’; that was the code he lived by, as long as the ‘go without’ didn’t actually happen.

‘The dead are dead,’ he went on, ‘and the truth is that one forgets about people when they stop coming to dinner. There are exceptions, of course — namely, the people one forgets dinner.

‘But that’s what charm is: being malicious about everybody except the person you are with, who then glows with the privilege of exemption.’

These people were deplorable snobs, but I figured it was OK to laugh with them as long as I laughed at them, as well. Another subject in this first book was not at all laughable. Many reviews mention it explicitly, but I won’t in case any of you want to read it as I did without knowing. The impact is likely greater that way.

In the second of the four novels, Patrick is in his early twenties and his life is a mess. He’s on a trip to New York to collect his father’s ashes. A dead father is not the source of his trouble, though – a rather nasty drug habit is. His trust fund money is running out fast as he attempts to achieve a delicate balance of smack, coke, booze, ludes, pot and speed. The logistics in maintaining just the right high are complicated, as are any attempts to function in front of his father’s old friends. This was an important novel for the context it gave regarding both Patrick’s life and that of his father who was also a product of family dysfunction.

Book three, called , delivers what the title suggests. Patrick is a little older and a lot less addled. The toxicity in this one stems from the shallow lives of the upper crust. A grand party in the English countryside is the primary setting, and one of the attendees is Princess Margaret. St. Aubyn had met her in real life and evidently took advantage of the royal distaste for libel suits because he painted her as the epitome of self-importance with unmitigated disdain for any who were less than sufficiently sycophantic. The cast of smug and disagreeable personalities in this book was a large one. In the end, many had simply merged into a single type. I took this book to be an exercise in self-discovery for St. Aubyn whose own background was not what you’d call ‘common’. He had to identify and ridicule the haughty behavior to set himself apart from it, at least partially. (He’s godfather to Earl Spencer’s son – Lady Di’s nephew – and still a bit of a toff.) His character, Patrick, comes across as well-educated, wicked, and funny; and still intractably damaged.

The fourth book, , was short-listed for a Booker. I’m sure that many would find it unfair to single out this one alone for the honor since the first three did so much to take the story to that point. By now Patrick is married and the father of two remarkable boys who share his best traits. His wife dotes on them so thoroughly that there’s no affection left over for him. The bottle becomes his most intimate friend, with a mistress running a distant second. Patrick’s mother gives him trouble, too. She attempted to fill holes in herself by way of charity and ended up being taken in by the oleaginous charms of a New Age spiritualist who convinced her to donate the family estate to his cause. Patrick was essentially disinherited when his soft-headed mum fell prey to the charlatan.

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The series ends with a fifth book called , but that was not included in this volume. I’ll review it separately. As you’re no doubt aware, I’m running long as it is.

In case it’s not already obvious, Edward St. Aubyn is Patrick Melrose. He had the same abusive father, the same mother who turned the blind eye in his youth and later gave away their estate, and the same struggles with addiction. In fact, St. Aubyn said he’s lucky to be alive. One day in his early 20’s he woke from a stupor with a syringe in his arm containing what surely would have been a fatal dose had he been unimpaired enough to administer it hours earlier. It’s easy to see how these novels could be viewed as a form of therapy. St. Aubyn decided to present what might otherwise have been a “misery memoir” as fiction instead. He said, “It’s more flexible. It goes beyond the mere shrill advancement of a complaint or a confession. I’m more interested in the dramatic truth of how something like cruelty occurs. That can be presented much more persuasively through fiction.”

These books are all about identity. As St. Aubyn said in the same

Nobody ever died of a feeling, he would say to himself, not believing a word of it, as he sweated his way through the feeling that he was dying of fear. People died of feelings all the time, once they had gone through the formality of materializing them into bullets and bottles and tumours. Someone who was organized like him, with utterly chaotic foundations, a quite strongly developed intellect and almost nothing in between desperately needed to develop the middle ground. Without it, he split into a vigilant day mind, a bird of prey hovering over a landscape, and a helpless night mind, a jellyfish splattered on the deck of a ship. ‘The Eagle and the Jellyfish’, a fable Aesop just couldn’t be bothered to write.

Patrick is complicated. I enjoy that, even when the complications are messy. What I enjoyed even more was the writing. I’ve already included a few passages, but want to include a few more to show that it’s witty, wise and urbane.

‘It’s I-find-everything-boring, therefore I’m fascinating. But it doesn’t seem to occur to people that you can’t have a world picture and then not be part of it.’

He was just one of those Englishmen who was always saying silly things to sound less pompous, and pompous things to sound less silly. They turned into self-parodies without going to the trouble of acquiring a self first.

Debbie’s father, an Australian painter called Peter Hickmann, was a notorious bore. Patrick once heard him introduce an anecdote with the words, ‘That reminds me of my best bouillabaisse story.’ Half an hour later, Patrick could only count himself lucky that he was not listening to Peter’s second-best bouillabaisse story.

Four bright, shiny stars for this collection. I can’t quite give it full marks, though, because at times it got to be too much. A lighter touch might have played better over the long haul. I realize that books focused on exorcising demons require evil at cask strength, but the ‘bad’ to be analyzed in this was just so bloody ubiquitous. At times the cleverness got in the way, too. A character or a trait might have been described as both X and Y where X and Y were negatively correlated and slightly ironic. It was appealing the first few times, but a tad over-used in the end. Even so, when I look back at all the highlighted lines, I realize there were many fewer misses than hits. Recommended for those who can handle occasional excesses for the pleasures of high-risk returns.

Investors talk often about risk-return tradeoffs. The more volatile an asset is, the higher the expected return has to be to want to hold it. The four short books packaged together asare at the extreme end of the risk-return spectrum. Edward St. Aubyn took big chances hoping the rewards would be commensurate. He risked alienating readers at every turn with characters who are loathsome or over-exposed. And with the depth of the interior development, the potential losses (and gains) in credibility were magnified. Fortunately, from this investor’s point of view, the gamble paid off. It helps to have a taste for an acerbic wit. Realize, too, we’re not talking about vinegar here; more like sulfuric acid.In novel number one, Patrick is only five years old, living with his family in the south of France where the money from his mother’s side of the family allows them to liveon the hog. Forgive me for flogging the metaphor, but such dining offers no guarantee against indigestion. Patrick’s father, David, is the primary cause, though his lush of a mother can be faulted, too, for her lack of intervention. David came from an aristocratic English family. He had at one time been a talented pianist and had also been trained as a physician (though one who must have had his fingers crossed when he took the Hippocratic Oath). By the time of this story, he was vile and abusive. Hard-not-to-cringe abusive, in fact. Patrick was a bright boy and, by nature, quite brave, but he lacked the power to stand up to his father.Much of the first story took place at a dinner party attended by David’s imperious friends. Zingers like this were bandied about:These people were deplorable snobs, but I figured it was OK to laugh with them as long as I laughed at them, as well. Another subject in this first book was not at all laughable. Many reviews mention it explicitly, but I won’t in case any of you want to read it as I did without knowing. The impact is likely greater that way.In the second of the four novels, Patrick is in his early twenties and his life is a mess. He’s on a trip to New York to collect his father’s ashes. A dead father is not the source of his trouble, though – a rather nasty drug habit is. His trust fund money is running out fast as he attempts to achieve a delicate balance of smack, coke, booze, ludes, pot and speed. The logistics in maintaining just the right high are complicated, as are any attempts to function in front of his father’s old friends. This was an important novel for the context it gave regarding both Patrick’s life and that of his father who was also a product of family dysfunction.Book three, called, delivers what the title suggests. Patrick is a little older and a lot less addled. The toxicity in this one stems from the shallow lives of the upper crust. A grand party in the English countryside is the primary setting, and one of the attendees is Princess Margaret. St. Aubyn had met her in real life and evidently took advantage of the royal distaste for libel suits because he painted her as the epitome of self-importance with unmitigated disdain for any who were less than sufficiently sycophantic. The cast of smug and disagreeable personalities in this book was a large one. In the end, many had simply merged into a single type. I took this book to be an exercise in self-discovery for St. Aubyn whose own background was not what you’d call ‘common’. He had to identify and ridicule the haughty behavior to set himself apart from it, at least partially. (He’s godfather to Earl Spencer’s son – Lady Di’s nephew – and still a bit of a toff.) His character, Patrick, comes across as well-educated, wicked, and funny; and still intractably damaged.The fourth book,, was short-listed for a Booker. I’m sure that many would find it unfair to single out this one alone for the honor since the first three did so much to take the story to that point. By now Patrick is married and the father of two remarkable boys who share his best traits. His wife dotes on them so thoroughly that there’s no affection left over for him. The bottle becomes his most intimate friend, with a mistress running a distant second. Patrick’s mother gives him trouble, too. She attempted to fill holes in herself by way of charity and ended up being taken in by the oleaginous charms of a New Age spiritualist who convinced her to donate the family estate to his cause. Patrick was essentially disinherited when his soft-headed mum fell prey to the charlatan.The series ends with a fifth book called, but that was not included in this volume. I’ll review it separately. As you’re no doubt aware, I’m running long as it is.In case it’s not already obvious, Edward St. Aubyn is Patrick Melrose. He had the same abusive father, the same mother who turned the blind eye in his youth and later gave away their estate, and the same struggles with addiction. In fact, St. Aubyn said he’s lucky to be alive. One day in his early 20’s he woke from a stupor with a syringe in his arm containing what surely would have been a fatal dose had he been unimpaired enough to administer it hours earlier. It’s easy to see how these novels could be viewed as a form of therapy. St. Aubyn decided to present what might otherwise have been a “misery memoir” as fiction instead. He said, “It’s more flexible. It goes beyond the mere shrill advancement of a complaint or a confession. I’m more interested in the dramatic truth of how something like cruelty occurs. That can be presented much more persuasively through fiction.”These books are all about identity. As St. Aubyn said in the same interview , they address ‘Why we are as we are, and whether we have any choice in the matter. The entire Melrose series is explicitly about that, whether we can lead a voluntary life. The most primitive definition of freedom is being able to place your attention where you choose, and Patrick is someone who is drastically unable to do that. His attention is usurped by memories, by addictions, by obsessions.’ Does this deplorable determinism persist throughout? We’d all have to have read the entire series to discuss that. As of book four, though, Patrick was still sorting it out:Patrick is complicated. I enjoy that, even when the complications are messy. What I enjoyed even more was the writing. I’ve already included a few passages, but want to include a few more to show that it’s witty, wise and urbane.Four bright, shiny stars for this collection. I can’t quite give it full marks, though, because at times it got to be too much. A lighter touch might have played better over the long haul. I realize that books focused on exorcising demons require evil at cask strength, but the ‘bad’ to be analyzed in this was just so bloody ubiquitous. At times the cleverness got in the way, too. A character or a trait might have been described as both X and Y where X and Y were negatively correlated and slightly ironic. It was appealing the first few times, but a tad over-used in the end. Even so, when I look back at all the highlighted lines, I realize there were many fewer misses than hits. Recommended for those who can handle occasional excesses for the pleasures of high-risk returns.

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Patrick Melrose: Pleased To Meet You


Meet your new favourite troubled aristocrat. Starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Hugo Weaving \u0026 Jennifer Jason Leigh, Patrick Melrose is coming soon.

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Patrick Melrose: Pleased To Meet You

Office Hours – SNL


A professor’s (Benedict Cumberbatch) chats with a student (Pete Davidson) help him realize something about himself.
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David Melrose – Piano Virtuoso (Patrick Melrose Soundtrack)


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David Melrose - Piano Virtuoso (Patrick Melrose Soundtrack)

Benedict Cumberbatch Says ‘Patrick Melrose’ Is Most Difficult Role Of His Career


Benedict Cumberbatch says his new series “Patrick Melrose” presented him with the most difficult role of his career. Plus, the actor reveals how he landed one of his dream roles.
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Benedict Cumberbatch Says 'Patrick Melrose' Is Most Difficult Role Of His Career

นอกจากการดูบทความนี้แล้ว คุณยังสามารถดูข้อมูลที่เป็นประโยชน์อื่นๆ อีกมากมายที่เราให้ไว้ที่นี่: ดูบทความเพิ่มเติมในหมวดหมู่Music of Turkey

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